It’s been a long time since I wrote to this blog. 
Once the project finished, it only felt right to stop blogging each day along with my routine. 
But this morning I received the heartbreaking news that my great-grandmother (Super Nanny) Marjorie Violet Jukes passed away aged 87. 

She was the inspiration for this project from the start, and although she is now gone, she will never be forgotten. She lives on in her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She lives on in the people who knew her, met her. And she lives on in this project. An experience I hope I never forget. 

It’s been a long time since I wrote to this blog. 

Once the project finished, it only felt right to stop blogging each day along with my routine. 

But this morning I received the heartbreaking news that my great-grandmother (Super Nanny) Marjorie Violet Jukes passed away aged 87. 

She was the inspiration for this project from the start, and although she is now gone, she will never be forgotten. She lives on in her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She lives on in the people who knew her, met her. And she lives on in this project. An experience I hope I never forget. 


My new project.

My new project.


Highlights.

Here is a link to a ‘highlights’ of this blog.

http://standardprocedure.tumblr.com/

This sits alongside my written book ‘Standard Procedure’, which can be purchased here:

http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/2893517

These documents give a glimpse of the project as a whole, without having to look through the whole of this blog (which I realise is huge!) 



Standard Procedure

Collaboration with Emily Stephen


Today, whilst on the train home from work, I watched a boy walk backwards and forwards.

He first walked backwards and forwards on the platform. I could see him through the window. I wondered if he was counting to a certain number of times until he stopped. I looked for a pattern.

He then stepped onto the train (which had been waiting at the platform for 10 minutes to leave), and started walking backwards and forwards, up and down the aisle. And then between two of the doors.

He did this for the entire journey. 

Someone asked him if he was ok, to which he replied “Yes, I’m fine” and carried on.

When the train pulled into his station (the station before mine), he rested his head against the train doors.

Every other passenger had looked at him like he was crazy for the duration. 

I saw it as a performance.


Not as subtle as me. 


The Art of Dancing



From the installation at the Poly. 

25th November 2011